Adams - Torre 









E.Z. Adams (2200) - Carlos Torre (2450) 
[C62]
City Championship - New Orleans, LA,   1920 

***

[A.J.G. (+CB)]


A brilliant game of the first magnitude.  

Maybe  THE  game for exploiting a weakened back-rank. {A.J.G.} 

Chernev writes:   << "Wonderful!" is praise lightly bestowed today on chews and chips and Sealy-hams and cabin-chairs and kinks. 
                                  But what else can we say of this brilliancy which glistens with six Queen sacrifices in succession? >> 

(What the heck is a "KINK?" - A.J.G.) 

 

[ See the book, {The} "1000 Best Short Games of Chess,"  by Irving Chernev. Game # 944, pages 516-517. ] 

Played in New Orleans, Louisiana, 1920.


GM Andrew Soltis considers this game to be a fake, and for many years I vehemently disagreed with him. But it is quite possible that he is correct.

See GM Larry Evan's column in 'Chess Life,'  "Larry Evans on Chess." (Chess Life; December, 2002. Page # 63.) 


1. e4 e52. Nf3 d6;  
The Philidor's Defense. 

Most people assume this is inferior, but it is not. 

3. d4 exd4!?
;   
Perhaps surrendering the center too soon. 

          [Book is: 3...Nd7!; ---> A.J. Goldsby I ]

4. Qxd4!
,   
Probably the best. {A.J.G.} 

          [4.Nxd4!?= ] .

4...Nc6!?
;   
This has a slightly odd look to it. 
(It might have been better to preface this with ...a6 first.) 

          [ 4...a6; ---> Sznapik-Plachetka; 
            4...Qf6
; ---> Guez-Samama; 

            4...Nf6; 5.e5
           
(Or 5.Nc3 ---> Campora-Chiburdanidze
            5.Bg5
---> Sax-Tseshkovsky.)  5...Be7; 6.Nc3 ---> main line; 
           
5...Qe7; ---> Jansa-Ermenkov (5...dxe5; ---> Gufeld-Georgadze)  6.Be3 Ng4= ]

5. Bb5 Bd7!?
;  Hmmm.  
This is very stodgy and unnatural. {A.J.G.} 

          [ 5...Nf6; ---> Niedermayer-Speckner; 
            5...Nge7
; ---> Markovic-Nikolic (- '!'; {A.J.G.}) 
            6.0-0
a6; 7.Qa4 Be6; 8.Be2 h6!?; 9.Rd1 Qc8!; 10.Nbd2 g6; 11.c3 Bg7
            12.Qc2
0-0; 13.a4, ("+/=") {A.J.G.} ]

6. Bxc6 Bxc6
7. Nc3!?,   
Hitting the center. (This is very logical, controlling key central squares, and developing a piece.) 

          [ 7.Bg5 f6; ---> Morphy-Harrwitz  (7...Nf6; --> Anderssen-Paulsen) 
            7.c4!?
, ---> A.J. Goldsby I]  

7...Nf6
;   
Black develops. 

          [ Black could play: 7...Qf6 ---> Tringov-Acimovic; 
            Or 7...Ne7!? , ---> LM A.J. Goldsby I; 
            Or 7...h6!? ; ---> A.J. Goldsby I] 

8. 0-0!?
,   
Simple development, but maybe not the most precise. (Perhaps White needed to be a bit more aggressive here.) 

          [ 8. Bg5!,  ---> Gawliczek-Goebel.  8...Be7 ; 9.0-0-0 ].  

8...Be79. Nd5!?,   
Good, and very active. (But it is not clear if this is the absolute best.) 

          [ 9.e5; Or  9.Rd1.]  

9...Bxd5;   
Perhaps Black could have just castled instead. 

          [ 9...0-0!? ]   

10. exd5 0-011. Bg5 c6
; (!?) {Diagram?} 
It is not clear if this is the most accurate here for Black.

12. c4 cxd5
;   
The most accurate. 

          [ Not  12...Nxd5?!; 13.cxd5 Bxg5; 14.Nxg5 Qxg5
            15.dxc6
bxc6; 16.Qxd6, ("+/=") {A.J.G.}

                                                                                          (See the {analysis} diagram just below.) 

  Analysis position of the Adams-Torre game. (After 16. Qxd6)

 

            12...h6!? ]

13. cxd5 Re8
14. Rfe1 a5!?15. Re2 Rc8?!; ('?')   
Natural looking. ( Grabbing an open file, but probably not the best. {A.J.G.} )

          [ 15...h6!; ("=") ]. 

16. Rae1, ("+/=")  16...Qd717. Bxf6! Bxf6
;  
Black looks OK here ... but looks can be deceiving! 

White's next move is the first to receive an exclam from Chernev.
18. Qg4!
,  
Offering the Queen, which Black cannot take. 

          [ 18. Rxe8+!? ("=") ]

18...Qb5
;   
Forced. 

Now White's next five moves get one exclamation point each from Chernev. 

          [ Chernev writes:  "If 18...Qxg4; 19.Rxe8+ Rxe8; 20.Rxe8#, mate.  Black's Queen 
             must stay on the diagonal leading to the King's Rook." ] 

Chernev only gives White's next move one exclamation point, but that is surely too stingy.
19. Qc4!! Qd7
;   
Black cannot take. 

Chernev writes:  "Again he may not capture the Queen with either Queen or Rook." 

Once again, Chernev only gives White's next move a single exclam. 
  He could afford to be more generous for a move so brilliant.  
20.Qc7!! Qb5
; 21. a4!,   
Why this? (Because it's a nice move, trying to decoy the Black Queen.) 

          [ White could have fallen for: 21. Qxb7? Qxe2!; 22.Rxe2 Rc1+, ("-/+") 
             and it is White who will be mated on the back-rank. {A.J.G.} ]

21...Qxa4
22. Re4!!, (Maybe only - '!')  
Another nice decoy theme, hammering away at the fact that Black is tied to the defense of e8. 

Chernev writes: "This gives Black a choice of three different ways of capturing - none of them any good!"

22...Qb5
23. Qxb7!1 - 0   {Diagram?} 
Black is out of moves, and it is time to resign.  

Soltis (and many others) have said this game must be a forgery. But until I see or hear of positive proof to this effect, I prefer to believe the game is real.

  1 - 0  

 (Code initially)  Generated with  ChessBase 8.0   

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